Places To See In Bangalore

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_accordion][vc_accordion_tab title=”Cubbon Park”][vc_column_text]Sri Chamarajendra Park popularly known as Cubbon Park  is spread over 300acres, located in the heart of the city. This park is over 100 years.  The park has well laid out walking paths which serves a nature public park and also is a major lung space of Bangalore. A park best for nature enthusiast who can observe indigenous and exotic flora housing about 68 genera and 96 species with a total of around 6000 trees.

Sri Chamrajendra Park is under the control of the Department of Horticulture. The Deputy Director of Horticulture (Cubbon Park) is responsible for the administration and maintenance of the park.

Due to its density, this park is a home to variety of birds, amphibian, reptiles, insects and mammals, a delight to a nature enthusiast to learn, observe flora and local fauna

History :  

Sri Chamarajendra Park was established in the year 1870 by Sri John Meade, the then acting Commissioner of Mysore. The vast landscape of the park was conceived by Major General Richard Sankey, the then Chief Engineer of the State. As a mark of honour to Sri John Meade, the park was initially named as “Meade’s Park” and subsequently it was called the Cubbon Park.

In the year 1927, the park was officially renamed as “Sri. Chamarajendra Park” to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Sri. Krishnaraja Wodeyar’s rule in Mysore State.

Interesting fact :

Bangalore’s first Australian Silver Oak was planted in Sri Chamarajendra Park and it is still standing tall near the Tennis pavilion

Flora & Fauna

Painted Stork, Spot bellied Pelican, White chick barbet, Crow pheasant, House Crow, Ravens, Grey bellied Cuckoo, Black Drongo, Ashy Prinia, Trailer Bird, Flower Pecker,

Rose-ringed Parakeet, Purple-rumped Sunbird, Spotted dove, Egyptian Vulture,

White eyed Buzzard

Shikra, Black Kite, Brahmini Kite, Black shouldered Kite

Barn Owls, Spotted Owlet, Indian Scoops Owl, Nightjar, Night heron, Oriental Scoops Owl

Three striped Palm squirrel, Flying Fox, Short nosed Fruit bat, Indian  Pipistrelle, Mongoose, Indian Musk Screw

Cobra, Russell’s Viper, Green Keel Back, Checkered Keel Back. Bronzeback tree snake, Green Vine Snake, Wolf Snake

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk, Nature Photography[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”GKVK”][vc_column_text]Gandhi Krishi Vignana Kendra popularly known as GKVK, a bio-diversity hot-spot was established in 1964. This campus spreads across 412 acres, with 244 acres of plantation and a home to rare species of plants and several rare attracting butterfly plants

Apart from the rare butterflies, this campus is a home to variety of birds, amphibian, reptiles, insects and mammals, a delight to a nature enthusiast to learn, observe flora and local fauna

History :  

Her Excellency Maharani Kempa Nanjammanni Vani Vilasa Sannidhiyavaru, donated 30 acres of land in 1899 for agricultural research.  Dr. Lehmann a german scientist was appointed to conduct research on Soil corp with a laboratory in the Directorate of Agriculture. In 1913 the Mysore Agriculture Residential School was established under the able leadership of Dean of Mysore Sri.M Vishweshwaraiah. The school was later upgraded to Agriculture College

Interesting fact :

It has been recorded that this campus has a Scrub forest which has been in existence since 1573.

The Karnataka Biodiversity Board has declared the campus a heritage site under Section 37 (i) of the Biological Diversity Act,2002. The greens hope the declaration will dissuade land grabbers and spare the campus from commercialisation and urbanisation. The Gandhi Krishi Vignan Kendra (GKVK) campus has been declared as a biodiversity hotspot by the Union Ministry of Environment, Ecology and Forests(MoEF).

Flora & Fauna

165 bird species, 90 types of butterflies and ten species each of mammal and reptile that are unique to the area.

277 species of  fungi, 53 species of mite, 530 plant species have been recorded at GKVK, 46 species are medicinal plants, 24 species have high medicinal value, 6 are rare plant species, 4 species are endemic (to deciduous forest) species and one is an endangered species (Albizia odoratissima).

GKVK has a very high density of sandalwood growth and the conditions are ideal for its natural regeneration.

Bonnet Macaque, Slender Loris, Jungle Cat, common Mongoose, Jackal, Flying Fox, Shortnosed Fruit Bat, Indian Pipistrille
Three-striped Palm Squirrel, Indian Mole Rat, Badicoot, Black-naped Hare,Wild Boar .
Pond Heron, Cattle Egret, Smaller Egret, Little Egret, Open bill Stork, Black winged Kite, Honey Buzzard, Pariah Kite, Brahminy Kite, Goshawk, Shikra, Sparrow Hawk, White eyed Buzzard, Tawny Eagle, Greater Spotted Eagle, Whitebacked Vulture, Montague’s Harrier, Marsh Harrier, Short-toed Eagle.

 

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”JP Park”][vc_column_text]About :

Jayaprakash Narayan Bio diversity park popularly known as JP park, spread over 85 acres consisting of 4 water bodies of 15 and 9 acres respectively situated in Mathikere, North-West Bangalore.  This park was opened in 2006 by the then chief minister of Karnataka.

BBMP, has developed and maintained this first of a kind park which has a patch of Bamboo growth and the water bodies attract several aquatic birds. This park has lawn spread over 25 acres, which is a home to varied insects, reptiles and mammals. This park is the largest BBMP Park in Bangalore.

 

History :  

The foundation stone was laid by Chief Minister Ramakrishna Hegde but the development happened a year later in 2006 by Chief Minister H.D Kumarswamy

Interesting fact :

The lakes in this park has Indian Magur Fish which is found only here in Bangalore

Flora & Fauna

250 varieties of trees and shrubs

Birds like White breasted water hen, Common Moorhen & Purple Moorhen, Little Cormorant,

Painted Stork, Spot bellied Pelican, White chick barbet, Crow pheasant, House Crow, Ravens, Grey bellied Cuckoo

Shikra, Black Kite, Brahmini Kite, Black shouldered Kite,

Barn Owls, Spotted Owlet, Indian Scoops Owl, Nightjar, Night heron, Oriental Scoops Owl

Three striped Palm squirrel, Flying Fox, Short nosed Fruit bat, Indian Pipistrelle, Indian Musk Screw

Cobra, Russell’s Viper, Green Keelback, Checkered Keelback, Bronzeback tree snake, Green Vine Snake

 

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk, Nature Photography

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Lalbhag”][vc_column_text]About :

Lalbagh, a botanical garden spreading over 240acres in the heart of the city housing varied species of flora. The trees in Lalbagh remind you of the love our forefathers had for nature, as they are over 100years old.  This garden had variety of Red roses grown round the year until 1856 and hence the name Lalbagh – (red garden). The significance of the name still exists as you can see variety of Roses even today. This garden is under the aegis of the Directorate of Horticulture, Government of Karnataka & has nearly 673 genera and 1,854 species of plants. The collection of the plants has made it a veritable treasure house.  The water body in the garden is a huge attraction as it attracts several aquatic birds, amphibians & reptiles

Most of the Nature Lovers even today find Lalbagh their favourite destination as it gives them a vast experience of exotic & native flora, a place to observe varied species of birds, amphibian, reptiles and a full house of insects

History :  

Lal Bagh Botanical Garden was commissioned by the ruler of Mysore, Hyder Ali. Hyder Ali started building the Garden of Lal Bagh in the year 1760 and his son Tipu Sultan completed the garden. The credit of  the development of this natural lake and its surrounding areas goes to the then Superintendent of Lalbagh, James Cameroon. He was the person who commissioned the lake in 1890 to provide water to the botanical garden. Under his orders the bund was built and ornamental steps leading to the lake was constructed. He also set up a waste weir to the lake. This garden surrounds one of the towers erected by the founder of Bangalore, Kempe Gowda.

Interesting fact :

The Lal Bagh Rock, one of the oldest rock formations on earth, dating back to 3,000 million years made up of peninsular gneissic rock

You will also see a 20 million years old tree fossil at Lalbagh botanical garden

Flora & Fauna

Birds like White breasted water hen, Common Moorhen & Purple Moorhen, Little Cormorant

Painted Stork, Spot bellied Pelican, White chick barbet, Crow pheasant, House Crow, Ravens, Grey bellied Cuckoo

Shikra, Black Kite, Brahmini Kite, Black shouldered Kite,

Barn Owls, Spotted Owlet, Indian Scoops Owl, Nightjar, Night heron, Oriental Scoops Owl

 

Three striped Palm squirrel, Flying Fox, Short nosed Fruit bat, Indian Pipistrelle, Mongoose, Indian Musk Screw

Cobra, Russell’s Viper, Green Keelback, Checkered Keelback. Bronzeback tree snake, Green Vine Snake

 

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk, Nature Photography[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Turahalli”][vc_column_text]About :  TURAHALLI Forest is the only LAST remaining forest in Bangalore. This forest is spread over 800acres of land near Gublala village and belongs to the State Forest Department . This forest has a variety of trees and wild shrubs which are mostly dry deciduous in nature and has couple of small hillocks, good for rock climbing.

This is the only place left for Nature enthusiasts to actually witness the green lushes of what Bangalore once used to be. A place where one can still spend a whole day mesmerised with different species of  birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and micro flora-fauna.

History :  

Turahalli Forest once known as the Elephant corridor was home to many other wildlife species that are not existent here today. Mammals like Elephants, Leopards, Slender Loris, Pangolin, Porcupine, Jackals who once dominated Turahalli have lost their habitat today.

Interesting fact :

This last bit of forest amidst urbanisation is the only lung space for birds that no longer can survive in the heart of Bangalore. One could sight even common birds reaching out to Turahalli Forest for survival. This green patch surrounded by concrete jungle on all sides is the only last hope of survival for the Cheetals.

Flora & Fauna

White chick barbet, Crow pheasant, House Crow, Ravens, Shikra, Black Kite, Brahmini Kite, Black shouldered Kite, Red vented Bulbul, Small Minivet, Oriental White eye, Golden Oriole, Great Indian Horned Owl.

Barn Owls, Spotted Owlet, Indian Scoops Owl, Nightjar, Night heron, Oriental Scoops Owl.

Three striped Palm squirrel, Flying Fox, Short nosed Fruit bat, Indian Pipistrelle, Mongoose, Indian Musk Screw , Black napped Hare, Spotted deer.

Cobra, Russell’s Viper, Green Keelback, Checkered Keelback. Bronzeback tree snake, Green Vine Snake.

 

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk, Nature Photography, Rock Climbing.[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Wetlands of Bangalore”][vc_column_text]About :  Bangalore, the once garden city was also known for its wetland. A beautiful city with a blend of greenery and lakes, was a home to most of the flora and fauna, both native and migratory.  The lakes came into existence in the 16th century by damming the natural valley which severed about 51 lakes within the city. It was the brain child of  Sri Kempagowda and the Wodeyars to connect each lake with one another, so the water drawn from Arkavati and Pinakini rivers fill the lakes across the city. This design better known as “Raja Kaluve” connected each lake across the city, ensured none of the lakes dried up. The rain harvesting system is not new to Bangalore, this was followed during the 16th century itself and the rain water would be released back into the lakes. These lakes were the only water source to the city. Today, Bangalore is left with only 17lakes which are also on the verge of encroachment or turning into Landfill locations and are causing a threat to migratory birds and Urban Wildlife.

History :

Lord Cornwallis in 1791 sent a troupe of soldiers from the then Madras, to identify an alternate route to Srirangapatna to fight Tippu Sultan. The Captain who led the troupe was amazed to see the climate and environment of Bangalore and called it the “Land of a Thousand Lakes”.

With urbanisation and expansion, the design of water source changed completely and Bangalore was connected directly to Cauvery river thus drying up the lakes one by one. The Raja Kaluve canal, once the water source to Bangalore has now turned into connecting drainage system within the city.

 

Interesting fact :

Bangalore City is still a pit-stop to many migratory birds though the volumes are reducing by the year.

Most of the Nature enthusiasts even today find the wetlands of Bangalore an interesting place, as it gives them a vast experience of wetland flora and fauna, a place to observe varied species of birds, amphibian, reptiles and a full house of insects. Prime lakes like Hebbal, Jakkur, Madiwala, Varthur, Sankey are a feast to any individual.

 

Flora & Fauna

Birds like White breasted water hen, Common Moorhen & Purple Moorhen, Little Cormorant.

Painted Stork, Spot bellied Pelican, White chick barbet, Crow pheasant, House Crow, Ravens, Grey bellied Cuckoo.

Shikra, Black Kite, Brahmini Kite, Black shouldered Kite,

Barn Owls, Spotted Owlet, Indian Scoops Owl, Nightjar, Night heron, Oriental Scoops Owl.

Three striped Palm squirrel, Flying Fox, Short nosed Fruit bat, Indian Pipistrelle.

Green Keelback, Checkered Keelback. Bronzeback tree snake, Green Vine Snake, Common Trinket, Rat snake.

 

Activities

Bird watching, Nature Walk, Nature Photography.[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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